War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0769 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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he would begin to move upon the rear of Nashville during this week. A report from Colonel Morgan also gives me the information that he has destroyed the tunnel on the railroad between Nashville and Louisville. I have therefore nothing to fear from Buell, and I will have opposed to me only the raw levies just being raised in the Northern States. Our presence will give the true men of Kentucky the opportunity for rallying to our standard, and in any event I can obtain large quantities of supplies, fall back here, and still be better off than now. I regret extremely, however, that I have no prominent Kentuckian with me, whose name can influence the wavering in his State. I strongly urge upon you to order General Marshall to advance at once through Pound Gap, and as it seems to me this is of all others the time to strike a decisive blow for our cause in the West, I request that re-enforcements and arms may be sent to me whenever it be practicable.

With high respect, I am, your obedient servant,

E. KIRBY SMITH,

Major-General, Commanding.

[AUGUST 21, 1863.-For Randolph to Loring, in reference to Marshall's operations in Kentucky, see Series I, Vol. XII, Part III, p.938.]

AUGUST 22, 1862.

Brigadier General HUMPHREY MARSHALL, Abingdon, Va.:

Dispatch was intended to prevent delay on supposition of a change of purpose. Do not wait for letter.

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE, Knoxville, Tenn., August 22, 1862.

Brigadier General C. L. STEVENSON,

Commanding First Division, Army of East Tennessee:

GENERAL: I have just received a dispatch from General Smith, dated the 20th instant, in which he states that he will move on Lexington on the 25th instant, and that Reynolds' brigade and [A.] Gracie's two regiments should be pushed on to join him. I am ignorant whether the general has been in direct communication with you or not; if so, you have probably already received instructions. If not, will you issue the necessary orders, and let Colonel Reynolds, with his brigade, join Colonel Gracie's command, if possible, at Big Creek Gap? An ammunition train of 40 wagons will leave here at 9 a.m. to-morrow, which Colonel Gracie is to escort. He will be instructed to move at once from Clinton and await the train at the top of the mountain.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. F. BELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

49 R R-VOL XVI, PT II