War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0768 KY.,M.AND E.TENN.,N.ALA., AND SW.VA. Chapter XXVIII.

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brilliant dash upon a superior force of the enemy, resulting in their utter discomfiture and the capture of 123 prisoners. The judgment and prudence of the previous dispositions exhibit high military skill. The vigor and boldness of the attack is a striking example of the spirit that now animates our cavalry and which is fast making them the terror of our invaders.

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By command of General Bragg:

GEO. G. GARNER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS, HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT NO.2,

No. 159. Chattanooga, Tenn., August 21, 1862.

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IV. Brigadier General J. K. Duncan, Provisional Army, will report to Major-General Polk for duty with Withers' division.

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By command of General Bragg:

[GEO. G. GARNER,]

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS, HDQRS. RIGHT WING, ARMY OF THE MISS.,

No. 5. Chattanooga, Tenn., August 21, 1862.

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II. Brigadier General J. K. Duncan will report for duty to Brigadier-General Withers, commanding Withers' division, right wing, to be assigned to the command of the brigade now commanded by Colonel Manigault.

By command of Major-General Polk:

GEORGE WILLIAMSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF EAST TENNESSEE, Barboursville, Ky., August 21, 1862.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS,

President of the Confederate States:

SIR: I took possession of this place on the morning of the 18th, the enemy having previously retired to Cumberland Gap. I find the country hereabouts almost completely drained of supplies, and I gather from my best sources of information that the enemy [some 7,000 strong] occupies Cumberland Gap, and has rendered it quite impregnable, at least to the force I have. In my judgment then I have but one of two things to do, either to fall back to East Tennessee for supplies or to advance upon Lexington for them. While I regard the latter course as a very bold one, yet I have unhesitatingly decided to take it, as being unquestionably the lesser of two evils; but I think it not at all impossible that my advance with a force of nearly 10,000 men into the bluegrass region now may be attended with the most brilliant results. A letter from General Bragg, just received, tells me he thought it not impossible