War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0757 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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by the aid of a little Government credit. This would not only facilitate transportation, but open to us large resources now cut off for want of it. While we may hope to recover the country in advance of us and avail ourselves of its great resources, it is prudent to secure all necessary means in our rear to avoid disaster should our well-grounded expectations not be realized.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BRAXTON BRAGG,

General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT NO.2, Chattanooga, Tenn., August 14, 1862.

Brigadier General N. B. FORREST,

Commanding, &c., Prestonville, Tenn.:

GENERAL: In reply to your communication of the 12th instant I am directed to inform you that no mountain howitzers are available; besides they are not efficient, as the carriages break down. Light brass 6-pounders are regarded as more effective and reliable, a battery of which will be sent you, if to be had, to be taken into the field without caissons, the 50 rounds in limbers being enough for a dash. The men to these guns must be mounted. Our cavalry has not yet reached here. It will be advanced as soon as practicable. It is hoped General Smith will not detach any of the Texas cavalry. He should begin to cross the river in a very short time. The chief paymaster will be instructed to provide funds immediately.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOMAS JORDAN.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE, Knoxville, Tenn., August 14, 1862.

Brigadier General C. L. STEVENSON,

Commanding First Division:

GENERAL: Your communications of this morning* is received. The commanding general left at 4 a.m. to-day. I will forward him the extracts cut from the Louisville Journal, some of which are interesting and confirmatory of the intelligence received from other sources regarding the state of public feeling in Kentucky. At 1 o'clock to-day a telegram reached here from General H. Marshall, stating that the President had checked his movement and would not allow him to proceed. I forwarded the dispatch immediately to General Smith, who will I presume transmit it to you. I do not understand what battery ["not [G. A.] Huwald's"] you allude to in your letter, and therefore cannot now answer your inquiry. I shall refer it to the general, to whom I write to-night.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. F. BELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

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*Not found.

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