War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0751 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

received for disposition of enemy's prisoners in this department. Shall I send them to Vicksburg?

BRAXTON BRAGG,

General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE, Knoxville, Tenn., August 11, 1862.

General BRAXTON BRAGG,

Commanding Department No. 2, Chattanooga, Tenn.:

GENERAL: Your letter of the 8th instant is just received. At the time of my interview with you at Chattanooga I had already seen General Orders, No. 50, but I then, as I now do, placed the portion of my department referred to, or any other portion you might desire, under your direction. I will move at once with my troops to carry out the plan agreed upon between us, and I deem it almost superfluous to say that I will make no movement that your judgment does not sanction. With an equal confidence as that expressed by yourself that where the first thought of each of us is the success of our cause no misunderstanding can arise, I am, cordially and most respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. KIRBY SMITH,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE, Knoxville, Tenn., August 11, 1862.

General BRAXTON BRAGG,

Commanding, &c., Army of the Mississippi:

GENERAL: Your letter of 10th instant has this moment come to hand. I will move as quickly as possible and take position in Morgan's rear, where I expect to be by next Sunday evening. Should he have evacuated the Gap I will of course follow him and fight him wherever I can find him. Otherwise I will remain in position in his rear until you think I can move rapidly upon Lexington. I would, however, give it as my opinion that every moment we delay will lessen the great advantages to be gained by an immediate move upon Lexington. General Marshall, with whom I have had a personal interview, is by this time moving toward Piketon, Morgan County, Ky., with about 3,000 men.

I am, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. KIRBY SMITH,

Major-General, Commanding.

AUGUST 11, 1862.

Major W. R. HUNT:

It is indeed with great reluctance I address you; but you will please to excuse me, considering circumstances into which we are thrown by the savageness of our foes and the unavoidable necessities in prosecution of our warfare. General Bragg is pressing me every day to collect such supplies as will be indispensable to carry successfully to speedy termination this war and to merit respect and peace from the invaders of our soil. I have no rest; my all, soul and mind, is occupied how to