War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0717 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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RICHMOND, VA., July 2, 1862.

General E. KIRBY SMITH, Knoxville, Tenn.:

I have ordered to Chattanooga the Forty-first Alabama Regiment, and Tuscalossa, said to be 1,250 strong; the regiments of Colonels Harkie and Barkuloo, near Dalton; the battalions of Colonel Lawton. They are all unarmed. Communicate with the Forty-first Alabama directly, and with the others through Major John Dunwody, Camp Randolph, via Dalton. Instruct them where they shall receive their arms, and instruct Colonel H. W. Hilliard at Montgomery, where he shall arm his Legion. He requires about 1,000. I don't know the strength of the others. We are sending to Atlanta the 6,000 stand of arms called for, and can increase the number if you desire it. Severe fighting still going on between Lee and McClellan on James River, 15 miles below Richmond. Acknowledge the receipt of this telegram.

G. W. RANDOLPH,

Secretary of War.

RICHMOND, VA., July 2, 1862.

Major DUNWODY, Camp Randolph, via Dalton:

Report by telegraph the movements of the troops to General Leadbetter at Chattanooga, and General E. K. Smith, Knoxville, and inform them tht they are unarmed. General Smith has required arms to be sent to Atlanta, and will give the necessary orders about arming the troops.

G. W. RANDOLPH,

Secretary of War.

RICHMOND, VA., July 2, 1862.

Governor SHORTER, Montgomery, Ala.:

I will order the Firty-first Alabama Regiment to Chattanooga. If Colonel Hilliard is still in Montgomery inform his that General Kirby Smith has requested arms for 6,000 men to be sent to Atlanta. I am shipping arms as rapidly as possible. He had better telegraph to General Smith for instructions about arming his Legion.

G. W. RANDOLPH,

Secretary of War.

KNOXVILLE, TENN., July 2, 1862.

Brigadier General HENRY HETH,

Commanding Forces Chattanooga, Tenn.:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding directs me to inform you that General McCown's division will soon commence to arrive at Chattanooga. You can ascertain by telegraph where the head of his column is. He suggests the propriety of apprising your troops of the arrival of re-enforcements and encouraging them by some order calculated to inspire confidence. Meanwhile, should the enemy attack you, he hopes you will be able to hold your position till the re-enforcement arrives. I am further directed to say that Colonel Boggs, chief of engineers, of Governor Brown's staff, having offered his services, has been temporarily assigned to duty on the staff of the major-general commanding