War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0698 KY., M. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXVIII.

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say further that he does not wish to yield the railroad without a contest. The force of the enemy which made its appearance at Tazewell he cannot but believe is a foraging expedition. Should he, however, advance in strength the commanding general will endeavor to concentrate and meet him. All communications by courier have failed. You had better establish a line, with relays from your headquarters, to Knoxville by Blain's Cross-Roads, and send duplicate copies of your dispatches by Morristown. If Yeiser has extra men enough to man four pieces direct him to send to men immediately to Knoxville, when pieces and equipments, ready here, will be turned over to him.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. F. BELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

P. S. - If Yeiser has not a sufficient number of extra men to man four pieces the complement may be made up from the Eufaula Light Artillery. The general also directs that you send your extra wagons not required by you at once to Knoxville.

KNOXVILLE, TENN., June 22, 1862.

Brigadier General D. LEADBETTER, Chattanooga Tenn.:

Send here 2,000 infantry instead of 1,000 as ordered by telegraph this morning.

By command of Major General E. Kirby Smith:

J. F. BELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

KNOXVILLE, TENN., June 22, 1862.

Brigadier General C. L. STEVENSON,

Commanding Second Brigade:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding directs that you will send all the companies of Cooke's regiment Tennessee Volunteers now with your command to Strawberry Plains, including also that at Morristown. Lieutenant-Colonel Eakin should accompany them and assume command at that post.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. F. BELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

KNOXVILLE, TENN., June 22, 1862.

Major A. R. HARPER,

Commanding Cavalry, Maynardville, Tenn.:

MAJOR:The major-general commanding directs that you will scout well and thoroughly toward Tazewell. You should communicate with the forces at Blain's Cross roads by courier and apprise the commanding officer there of all movements of the enemy, and send also to these headquarters all information you may obtain. The general desires to be informed whether you have arranged for a line of couriers and where the relays posted. Harbesson's, 12 miles from here, has been heretofore one of the stations.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. F. BELTON.