War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0691 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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his command direct him to keep a lookout for them. He may have fine opportunity to secure the whole party.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. F. BELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

KNOXVILLE, TENN., June ;18, 1862.

Brigadier General C. L. STEVENSON, Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: Your telegram, stating that General Barton had gone by Bean's Station, has been received. I am directed by Major General E. Kirby Smith to state that if not pushed by the enemy you can make a stand at Tazewell or its vicinity. If pushed to the rear you can hold Bean's Station and Clinch Mountain. The enemy should be detained as long as possible. The general wishes to force him on the Tazewell and Maynardville road toward Knoxville. Barton's command should take the road from Bean's Station to Knoxville; Allston's cavalry should occupy the Maynardville route and cover road from Powell's Valley. Six thousand rations and four wagon loads of corn have been sent to maynardville for Barton's command and can be used by Alston. Keep the commanding general advised of all your movements, and notify him when transportation is wanted by rail for your brigade and for what number. All quiet at Chattanooga.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. F. BELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

KNOXVILLE, TENN., June 18, 1862.

Colonel A. W. REYNOLDS,

Commanding, Loudon, Tenn.:

Major Howard reports large force of enemy at Post Oak Springs. If you hear anything to excite apprehensions for Kingston send Starnes in that direction. Order for court will be sent you by mail. Howard will send up two spies, whom you country. Direct Starnes to make official report of his late operations to these headquarters.

J. F. BELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

KNOXVILLE, TENN., June 18, 1862.

Brigadier General D. LEADBETTER, Chattanooga, Tenn.:

GENERAL: I am instructed by the commanding general to state to you that a battle will soon be fought somewhere north of the railroad, the result of which he hopes will be the relief of East Tennessee. In order to success it is absolutely essential that his re-enforcements should reach him at the proper moment. To this end he directs that you collects cars sufficient to transport 2,000 troops and keep them at Chattanooga, so that you can send them off immediately on the receipt of a telegram from him. He understands that the people of Chattanooga are in continual apprehension and alarm lest the place should be abandoned. He therefore calls your attention to the fact that nothing is so