War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0614 KY., M. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXVIII.

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and Dick's Rivers, massing there. General Thomas at Danville; General Buell in vicinity. Camp Dick Robinson is 7 miles from Danville; precipitous cliffs from 100 to 200 feet on one side or other of both streams for miles. General Buell's right wing can flank them and some down between the rivers by going up form 10 to 20 miles, where there are low banks. It is believed the rebels intend to fight at or near that point. I know nothing of Cincinnati column.

J. T. BOYLE,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, October 13, 1862.

Brigadier General GEORGE W. MORGAN, Portland, Ohio:

GENERAL: Before receiving your dispatch I had withdrawn three regiments form your division and attached them to the Army of Kentucky. One regiment was also taken from Point Pleasant. Three new regiments from Ohio have been ordered to replace them. General Cox, who left this morning, understands my views in regard to the reorganization of your command, which will I think meet your hearty concurrence. I hope to have your command out of Western Virginia and in Kentucky in thirty days.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, October 13, 1862.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

General Cox left for Point Pleasant this morning. He is instructed to, and appreciates the importance of, pushing operations as rapidly as possible.* General Morgan's forces will be refitted and ready as soon as other preparations are complete. I have drawn four old regiments form the Western Virginia force, replacing them by three new ones, which will occasion no delay.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, October 13, 1862.

Brigadier General J. T. BOYLE, Louisville, Ky.:

The cavalry of the column from Cincinnati ought to have reached Paris this morning. The infantry and artillery are not so far advanced, but are pushing forward as rapidly as possible. The column is small and has to move with caution. Troops to re-enforce it can be sent more safely by this line and almost as rapidly as by way of Frankfort. Moreover none arrive in condition to take the field and have to be fitted out. These are the reasons for bringing them here instead of to Louisville.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

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* See Wright to Cox, October 7, 1862, Series I, Vol. XIX.

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