War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0611 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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should be here. The troops from Illinois can be sent by Frankfort Railroad to Lexington much quicker than by Cincinnati. It is a misfortune that the Cincinnati [Column] is not now at Lexington; it seems to me that it ought to be hurried forward and re-enforced. I am sorry you have not General Morgan's army.

J. T. BOYLE,

Brigadier-General.

DANVILLE, KY., October 13, 1862 - 10.30 p.m .

(Received October 14, 1.35 a. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

Information received since my arrival here to-night leaves little room to doubt that the enemy is in retreat toward Crab Orchard - in fact that he commenced passing through Lancaster at 1 o'clock last night. My advance will march at 12 o'clock to-night. The enemy will, I think, divide his force at Crab Orchard, Bragg striking for Nashville by the way of Somerset and Smith going through Cumberland Gap. I shall direct the pursuit mainly against Bragg. The troops which Wright will have will be ample security against any attempt of Smith to return. General Negley, who is in command at Nashville, reports that the enemy had invested him in considerable strength and summoned him to surrender, which he promptly declined, and expressed himself confident of being able to hold out. But that force may be increased so as to endanger him. His supplies are also growing scant. I would advise that General Morgan be at once dispatched with the Cumberland Gap force by rail to Louisville and thence to Nashville in charge of a supply train. The railroad, with the protection which this movement would give, can be opened to within about 30 miles of Nashville in two weeks and all the way through in two more days.

D. C. BUELL,

Major-General.

IN CAMP, DANVILLE, KY., October 13, 1862 - 10.50 p.m.

(Received October 14, 7.10 a. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

I informed you in my dispatch of the 9th that on advancing to attack the enemy at 6 o'clock in the morning he was found to have fallen back during the night after the battle of the previous day. He took up a position and concentrated his whole force in front of Harrodsburg. I threw my right forward between Danville and Harrodsburg, and in that position awaited the arrival of the Second Division under General Sill. It arrived on the evening of the 11th. Strong reconnoitering columns were sent forward, The morning of that day, after some skirmishing, they reached Harrodsburg about 12 o'clock, capturing some stores and about 1,500 prisoners, 1,200 of them wounded and sick. The enemy's rear guard left about 10 o'clock, and his whole force is now near Camp Dick Robinson, in rear of Dick's River. My force is in front of that river and the enemy's position. The attack of the 8th on my left was made by the whole of Bragg's army proper. His loss was very heavy in killed and wounded, certainly not less than 2,000. We have some 1,200 of his wounded prisoners and about 500 prisoners not wounded.

D. C. BUELL,

Major-General.