War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0584 KY., M. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXVIII.

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[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO,

Camp near Huntsville, August 6, 1862.

Respectfully referred to Brigadier-General Rousseau, commanding Third Division, who will state whether he has any knowledge of any persons to whom protection was promised, as set forth within; and, if so, whether the protection has been claimed by the person himself or any one in his behalf; and, if so claimed, whether it has any instance been refused or neglected.

By command of General Buell:

JAMES B. FRY,

Colonel and Chief of Staff.

[Sub-inclosure.]

WASHINGTON, July 26, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

SIR: My attention has just been called to a letter republished in the Philadelphia Inquirer of this date, presenting some facts and statements concerning the Third Division of the Army of the Ohio.

From this letter I am led to fear that the commanding general of that army has returned to their masters slaves to whom I promised the permanent protection of the Government of the United States. These slaves had rendered valuable services and had obtained for me most important information, and to these negroes I offered protection under authority received from you in your telegram dated May 5.

I beg your interference in behalf of these slaves; and I must further ask, if possible, immediate action, for I fear that if they fall into the hands of their masters their lives will not be safe.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. M. MITCHEL,

Major-General.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO,

Huntsville, August 15, 1862.

General LORENZO THOMAS,

Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to return the letter of Major-General Mitchel, who, from some letter "republished in the Philadelphia Inquirer," has been led to fear that the commanding general of this army has returned to their masters slaves to whom he (General Mitchel) promised the permanent protection of the Government of the United States. I inclose also on the subject the reports of General W. S. Smith, who temporarily commanded the Third Division after General Mitchel's departure, and of General Rousseau, who succeeded General Smith as the permanent commander. These reports cover the whole ground as far as I have any knowledge. General Mitchel did not, to my recollection, speak to me of protection promised to any slaves; certainly he gave me no statement in regard to whose who merited protection for their services. Nevertheless I have no idea that any such have suffered. It would be contrary to my feelings and orders if such should have been the case.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL,

Major-General, Commanding.