War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0583 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., October 7, 1862.

His Excellency ABRAHAM LINCOLN,

President of the United States:

A messenger has just arrived from Nashville with a verbal message (not being safe to bring a written one) from Governor Johnson, with a request that I telegraph you asking that re-enforcements be sent to vicinity of Nashville-to Clarksville or Waverly. They apprehend an attack by forces under Breckinridge and Anderson. Rebel cavalry in force cuts city off from supplies in vicinity. The messenger bears an earnest from Governor Johnson that you will cause General Negley to be removed as commandant at Nashville, with request that I telegraph you on the subject. Messenger will return after I receive your reply.

Rebels retreated from Bardstown. Reported to be massing forces at Danville. General Buell is in pursuit, and will be at Perryville to-night within 10 miles of Danville. They must continue to retreat or fight.

J. T. BOYLE,

Brigadier-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington City, October 7, 1862.

Brigadier General O. M. MITCHEL, Washington City:

SIR: In compliance with the request contained in your letter of July 26, that investigation might be instituted concerning the alleged return of slaves to their masters by officers of Major-General Buell's command, the Secretary of War instructs me to inform you that prompt inquiry was made as to the facts.

A copy of General Buell's report, together with correspondence on the subject, is herewith inclosed.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. H. WATSON,

Assistant Secretary of War.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, July 28, 1862.

Major General D. C. BUELL,

U. S. Volunteers, Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: The Secretary of War directs me to send you the inclosed copy of a letter just received from General Mitchel, and to request that you will cause the matter there mentioned to be immediately examined and early report thereon made to this office.

Wherever the protection of the Government has been duly promised to any person, whatever his color or condition, the promise must be kept inviolate; and if any one, free, in the insurgent States has rendered valuable services or given important information he too must be protected, even though no promise to that effect was made.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.