War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0577 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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TWO MILES OUT ON THE NEW-CUT ROAD TO GLENVILLE,

October 5, 1862-2.30 p.m.

General THOMAS:

The enemy in force undoubtedly went out on this road. General Wood's note sent me by you I thought warranted my taking this road. Hope I am right. A negro has just informed me that about 16,000 rebels camped at Glenville last night. Some few camped between here and that place. I shall move on cautiously to Glenville.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. L. CRITTENDEN,

Major-General, Commanding Second Army Corps.

THREE MILES ON THE SPRINGFIELD ROAD,

October -, --.

Our advance some 600 yards to the front, and report the rebels drawn up across the road. The orderly who brought the information did not know whether these were infantry or not. I find there is a road practicable across from here to the intersection of the Bloomfield and Chaplin road. I shall across immediately.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. L. CRITTENDEN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

Glenville, October 5, 1862.

Major-General THOMAS:

GENERAL: I arrived at this place with the Fifth Division about 6 o'clock.

The cavalry picked up 10 or 12 prisoners, stragglers. I found here a good Union man, very reliable, at whose house Hardee staid last night. He informs me that they had been repairing the Walton Lick road and had Adams' brigade and a body of cavalry upon it, but they last night got some information which caused them to order back Adams suddenly, and he passed through this place about daylight toward Springfield. The cavalry did not return this way. The force here was from 16,000 to 20,000. Not knowing whether you would come to your quarters to-night or whether the messenger would meet you on the road I sent this information to General Buell at Bardstown, and also to General McCook or Rousseau at Bloomfield. Since writhing to General Buell, Dr. Palmer, a respectable man, has come in from Springfield, who left there since the rebels arrived, about 3 o'clock. He says they appear distressed, weary, and harassed, and that a large portion of them cannot go farther than that to-night; that a drove of very fine cattle did not get into Springfield before 12 o'clock. General Wood's troops are all in camp here now.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. L. CRITTENDEN,

Major-General, Commanding.

37 R R-VOL XVI, PT II