War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0555 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., September 29, 1862-11.45 a.m.

Major General HALLECK, General-in Chief:

Colonel McKibbin handed me your dispatch, placing me in command of the Department of the Tennessee. General Buell's preparations have been completed to move against the enemy, and I therefore respectfully ask that he may be retained in command. My position is very embarrassing, not being as well informed as I should be as the commander of this army and on the assumption of such a responsibility.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, September 29, 1862.

Major General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Louisville, Ky.:

The order relieving General Buell was not made by me nor on my advice and I have no power to change it. It was made before General Buell arrived at Louisville, and Colonel McKibbin was twice telegraphed not to deliver the dispatches till further orders, but he received the telegrams too late. This statement is necessary to explain the telegrams sent by me to General Buell. Please show it to him. You may consider the order as suspended till I can lay your dispatch before the Government and get instructions.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, September 29, 1862.

Major General D. C. BUELL and

Major General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Louisville, Ky.:

General orders changing the command of the Department of the Tennessee and the troops at Louisville and my instructions based on those orders are, by authority of the President, suspended, and General Buell will act on my telegram of a later date.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

CINCINNATI, September 29, 1862.

General BUELL:

Have just received intelligence, in which I place much confidence, that Marshall, instead of moving westward, had halted at Mount Sterling, and that Heth, with 4,000 or 5,000 men, left Paris on Thursday to join him. This looks like an attempt to intercept Morgan in his retreat from the Gap, and it is too late to prevent the attempt by any movement from here. Indeed Morgan ought to be near the Ohio by this time if not retarded by the rebels. Still the movement you are making ought to bring up Kirby Smith's forces to join Bragg and prevent serious combination against Morgan.

Very truly, yours,

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General.