War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0524 KY., M. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXVIII.

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tion for that object. You should retard him by all honorable means. The brigades over the Kentucky River ought to be destroyed if necessary for that object and it can be effected. The next thing of importance is that I should be able to form a junction with you. If necessary a pontoon or trestle bridge kept in readiness to be thrown across the month of Salt River might be very important for that purpose, and I wish you would have one prepared immediately. I learn that the force at Munfordville was attacked this morning and I fear it has been overpowered. You should fortify yourself.

The above dispatch is imperfect, having been sent of Evansville from Bowling Green by messenger and copied there; the messenger will probably be here to-night with perfect copy. It is evidently from Buell, and dated Sunday morning.

C. C. GILBERT,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, September 17, 1862-2 p. m.

General C. C. GILBERT,

Commanding, &c., Louisville, Ky.:

Can you make arrangements for prompt destruction of bridges on Kentucky River? Spare no efforts or money to accomplish it. I have made partial arrangements for destroying one of them, which may or may not succeed.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, September 17, 1862.

Brigadier General A. J. SMITH,

Commanding U. S. Forces, Covington, Ky.:

GENERAL: I shall leave for Louisville to-night, as stated in a previous communication, and you will be in command of the forces in this vicinity.

The columns under Gillmore and Murray should not I think proceed beyond Crittenden; unless therefore there is some good excuse for farther advance order them back after the advance reaches that vicinity or if thought best keep them a short time. Louisville is in some danger some of our force must be sent to that point.

Please therefore hold, say ten regiments ready to be transported to that point by rail and river, with as much transportation in the shape of wagons, ambulances, &c., as can be had.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

FORT MITCHELL, September 17, 1862.

General WALLACE:

Reports from the front state that the enemy are in full retreat. I ordered all the cavalry I have in front to follow up and ascertain the road and direction they were taking. Cannot I get rid of the Squirrel Hunters? They are under no control.

A. J. SMITH,

Brigadier-General.