War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0506 KY., M. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXVIII.

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ing them to Cincinnati is creating a panic and will ruin the State. The enemy cannot be so foolish as to move on Cincinnati, the farthest point from the base of his operations, with Buell's army in rear advancing northward. It is a trap in which General Wright will suffer us to be caught or suffer Buell's army to be cut off. They have near 40,000 men at cincinnati already; sufficient to resist the whole rebel army now in the State. I pray that you submit this matter to General Halleck. I pray God that Buell may soon be here to save our State.

J. T. BOYLE,

Brigadier-General.

LOUISVILLE, KY., September 11, 1862.

Major-General WRIGHT:

The withdrawing the troops from here is creating a panic and inviting the enemy to attack here and it will be done. If Louisville is taken the State is gone. There is too much nervousness about Cincinnati. The enemy are in no force in its front. The enemy are marching from Richmond and Lexington to Danville and in this direction. I beg that you will countermand for troops from this place; the troops being drawn from here is compromising Buell's army and may enable the enemy to cut him off. Buell's army is advancing northward. I believe the withdrawal of troops from here will be serious to the cause and to Kentucky.

J. T. BOYLE,

Brigadier-General.

LOUISVILLE, KY., September 11, 1862.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

I am convinced there is no real danger of an attack on Cincinnati. The real danger is cutting off the line of communication with General Buell's army from this place and after that the conquest of Louisville. It is impossible to give all the facts leading to this conviction, but the map of the country forces the importance of breaking the communication between this place and Buell's army; and the fact that the possession of Louisville will give the State to the Confederates and lead to the capture of Buell's army sustains the movements of their forces to this end, and the information that we have as to their designs in possession of Cincinnati could lead to no such consequences.

JAMES GUTHRIE.

LOUISVILLE, KY., September 11, 1862.

Major General HORATIO G. WRIGHT:

I have this morning reliable information that General Smith is now concentrating his troops at Frankfort for speedy attack on this place. All his forces that marched to Georgetown were taken from there to Frankfort. There are not 5,000 troops in all in the direction of Cincinnati. The entire demonstration is a delusion, rely upon, it and that city is in no danger. You have now 40,000 troops there and some 25,000 here, but troops are being ordered from here as fast as transportation can be obtained. This will be known to the enemy and will hasten his attack here and insure his success. I most earnestly urge a