War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0485 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS,

Cincinnati, Ohio, September 5, 1862 - 10 p.m.

Major-General HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

Have just received the following dispatch from Major-General Gillbert, at Louisville, Ky.:

I have reached this place with my command, and it is now posted the defense of the city. I had the most cordial and efficient support of Brigadier-General Jackson, Cruft, and Terrill. The reputation of the latter as an artillerist gave confidence and steadiness to the rear of the column. Captain Gay, late of the cavalry service, commanded the guard, and contributed very materially to the restoration of confidence in the column.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, September 5, 1862.

Major General C. C. GILBERT, Louisville, Ky.:

I congratulate you on your successful march and safe arrival. Last night, on intelligence form Louisville, I ordered Dumont in with his whole force. The information was incorrect, but the order was in my opinion right. The position there has given me much uneasiness. General Boyle thinks a regiment and a battery should be left; if we do, we shall lose them if the enemy attacks. The force there is a part of your command; you can do as you think best. See General Boyle on subject and get the reasons for his opinion.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

LOUISVILLE, September 5, 1862.

Major-General WRIGHT:

General Gilbert arrived this morning. I took Kirk's brigade and battery out to fall in rear and relieve the weary forces. No enemy pursuing except some 400 rebel cavalry. Reported here that the rebel infantry came to Versailles, crossed at Shryock's Ferry, and moving in large force their whole strength for this point. I have sent for Dumont's whole force; will be here to-night. Brought regiment from Bowling green and two from Munfordville. Urge Governor Morton to send one or two more regiments. Enemy never been to Paris and only a squad of cavalry been to Georgetown. I believe the enemy is moving in this direction.

J. T. BOYLE,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, September 5, 1862.

Brigadier General J. T. BOYLE, Louisville, Ky.:

I have no doubt of the propriety of abandoning Bowling Green. Supplies should be brought off at any rate. See Gilbert on the subject. Place liable to be cut off by an enterprising enemy. Munfordville I