War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0478 KY., M. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXVIII.

Search Civil War Official Records

but get it in readiness for moving. Have said this to him to-day. Shall leave for Cincinnati at 3 p. m.

H. B. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Louisville, September 3, 1862.

General E. DUMONT, Lebanon, Ky.:

Have received your dispatch. Axes, spades, and handles were sent you last night. Have referred furnishing shovels and scrapers to General Boyle. I leave for Cincinnati at 3 p. m. to-day. Keep a good lookout, and, if you need more mounted scouts, impress horses and mount your infantry. I have no cavalry to send you at this moment.

Morgan is at Danville, I think. Have no engineer officer in the department nor a cavalry or artillery officer unassigned.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

LOUISVILLE, KY., September 3, 1862 - 10.30 a. m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

How important is it to preserve the positions of Bowling Green and Munfordville? I have hitherto considered them of the utmost consequence and hence kept up their garrisons. At the former, where there is a large amount of stores, sent by order of General Buell, there is a force of about 2,200; at the latter nearly 4,000. It is difficult to get intelligence of the enemy's movements, but all accounts agree that he is this side of General Buell, with the design of attacking him or invading Kentucky. If the latter, the posts at Bowling Green and Munfordville would be in danger if the enemy's movements are rapid. When can I look for Granger's division? Time is everything with us now. Please answer promptly.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, September 3, 1862.

Major-General WRIGHT, Louisville, Ky.:

General Granger's division was at Tuscumbia. It will take some time to move it to Louisville. Telegraph to General Grant at Corinth to hurry it forward and to keep you informed of its movements.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

LOUISVILLE, KY., September 3, 1862.

The PRESIDENT:

The panic still prevails. Lexington and Frankfort in hands of the