War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0462 KY., M. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXVIII.

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You will take all the supplies left at Manchester, about 27,000 rations, and take along with you the troops on that road. It is of course desirable that you should avoid a battle, but you must also cover the movement of troops in front of you.

I cannot enter more into detail, but trust all to your discretion and courage.

D. C. BUELL.

NASHVILLE, August 31, 1862.

General BUELL:

I have just received following from General Boyle:

LOUISVILLE, August 31, 1862.

General ROUSSEAU, Nashville:

Captain Brown, quartermaster at Lexington, telegraphs me now (3.15 a. m.) that we were defeated at Richmond, Ky. Nelson taken prisoner. It has been a terrible battle. We have lost many valuable officers and men, besides our teams. Our great success reported in Virginia hardly compensated. The enemy is in the heart of the State in force. Advise General Buell.

J. T. BOYLE,

Brigadier-General.

L. H. ROUSSEAU.

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, ARMY OF THE OHIO,

McMinnville, August 31, 1862.

General BUELL, Decherd:

Thursday Forrest was whipped by Colonel Grose's men near Woodbury. Friday he attacked the stockade on the McMinnville Railroad 8 miles from here and was whipped again, and returned up Hickory Creek. Started yesterday; but few troops at Dunlap; seem to be camp guards of the cavalry which is said to be scouting in the mountains. They saw two small cannon near Pikeville, no infantry, and a small cavalry camp guard. I questioned them apart, and their stories agreed. A prisoner from the Georgia cavalry, Colonel Lawton's, has just been brought in; he confirms the stories of the Germans as to force at Pikeville. Between Colonel Grose, Captain Miller, McCook,