War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0457 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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Don't withdraw troops from latter place, and keep me advised of any change in locality of your forces.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, August 30, 1862.

Major General WILLIAM NELSON, Louisville, Ky.:

General Halleck says in reply to my telegram:

The relief of General Morgan and the holding of Cumberland Gap are deemed of the first importance.

We must therefore give our first attention to him; so make the necessary arrangement as far as you can, and I will hurry forward again the Ohio troops. How large a force will be needed? Give me your views.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, August 30, 1862.

Major General WILLIAM NELSON,

Commanding Army of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky.:

GENERAL: I infer from a conversation had with Captain Gilbert last night that you have misunderstood my views in regard to what is to be done and how to do it.

In the first place the instructions of General Halleck (such as they were) contemplated the relief of Morgan as of the first importance, and then to open the line to Buell, and with a view to this to mass the troops at some point in Kentucky. When I arrived I continued sending regiments to Lexington and Lebanon, with the exception of such as were supposed to be needed in guarding important points.

The rapidity with which they are moving at each place now depends upon the localities from which they come. I have directed those from Indiana and Illinois by Louisville, and I have advised the Governors accordingly, and done my utmost toward urgent them to hurry on their troops.

The last advices from Morgan regarding his situation and supplies are so favorable that we can delay any forward movement till we are fully prepared to effectively relieve him and turn our attention to general Buell's communications. How fast troops will come in on that line I cannot say, as the Governors of Indiana and Illinois are much behind the estimated they furnished. I have telegraphed them again, repeating my former urgent appeals for their quotas.

I wish you would give your attention to the organization of this force and indicate the places along the road where the troops should be sent. Your knowledge of localities will probably enable you to do so better than any one else.

Since writhing the above I have received a telegraphic message from General Halleck, as follows, in answer to mine of yesterday, expressing the opinion that General buell's case should receive the first attention: "The relief of General Morgan and the holding of Cumberland Gap are deemed of the first importance." You will therefore make the necessary