War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0425 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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Nelson is in Kentucky, with orders to organize a force for your relief. Troops are pouring in and will doubtless relieve you soon. The enemy is evidently trying hard to get you of the Gap.

JAMES B. FRY.

HEADQUARTERS,

Decherd, August 26, 1862.

Major MURRAY,

Third Kentucky Cavalry, Athens:

As you march across to this place drive in all the beef cattle you can collect on the way. This is important. Give receipts.

JAMES B. FRY.

HEADQUARTERS,

Decherd, August 26, 1862.

General ROSECRANS, Iuka:

Can you not give me some information about the divisions which are coming to me-where they are, &c.?

D. C. BUELL.

HEADQUARTERS,

Decherd, August 26, 1862.

General ROUSSEAU, Huntsville:

The cotton at Athens and Decatur Junction must be taken away before the movement of troops is executed. Mr. Beggs, railroad agent at Huntsville, will report as soon as this is completed, and then the movement of troops will be executed. You must go on to Nashville in person at once, and leave your staff officers or some other competent officers to execute properly the movement of troops when the cotton is removed. If General Rousseau has gone send to Colonel Lytle to execute.

JAMES B. FRY.

HEADQUARTERS,

Decherd, August 26, 1862.

General ROUSSEAU, Columbia:

Yes; better wait till morning. As soon as you get through take hold at once, organize your command, and have it thoroughly prepared for any emergency. You will have a good deal to do in that way, I suspect. Forrest and Morgan are reported at Lebanon, to attack Murfreesborough or Nashville.

D. C. BUELL.

HEADQUARTERS,

Decherd, August 26, 1862.

General THOMAS, McMinnville:

Keep your position at McMinnville, but make nothing like a permanent establishment. Be always ready to move at a moment's notice. That Bragg is this side of the river with a large force is beyond all question; it is hardly probable that it is merely for the purpose of demonstration, and we must be prepared to concentrate promptly. Of course the passage of so large a force across the mountains is difficult, but not so much so as you would suppose from the road you took. The Therman