War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0361 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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supposed if not apparent I respectfully request that I may be relieved. My position is far too important to be occupied by an officer on sufferance. I have no desire to stand in the way of what may be deemed necessary for the public good. In any event what I would earnestly recommend is that a cavalry force be sent here sufficient to cope with the enemy's cavalry and keep open the 400 miles of railroad on which this army is dependent for subsistence.

Lacking the cavalry, I have endeavored to diminish the heavy drain on the body of the army to protect its communications by building stockades, which would make small guards secure. This and the work of rebuilding roads has had to be done under the protection of heavy detachments and has been tedious. I apprehend that these heavy detachments will have to be repeated.

We are occupying lines of great depth. They are swarming with the enemy's cavalry and can only be protected by cavalry. It is impossible to overrate the importance of this matter. Three months ago I represented to the Department the necessity for eight more regiments of cavalry in Tennessee and Kentucky.

D. C. BUELL,

Major-General.

HUNTSVILLE, August 18, 1862.

WILLIAM B. HAZEN:

It is reported that Forrest, Morgan, and Starnes have united their forces and crossed the Cumberland, coming south toward Lebanon. Be always prepared.

D. C. BUELL,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS, Huntsville, August 18, 1862.

General JOHNSON,

Via Murfreesborough and McMinnville:

It is reported that Forrest, Morgan, and Starnes have united in large force and crossed the Cumberland, coming south toward Lebanon.

You should organize your force at once.

D. C. BUELL.

HEADQUARTERS, Huntsville, August 18, 1862.

General JOHNSON,

Via Murfreesborough and McMinnville by Courier:

The whole cavalry force, not otherwise assigned, is placed under your command. You will keep concentrated as much as possible; make your rendezvous at Murfreesborough, and from there operate so as to protect the lines of communication of the army with Nashville; protect Nashville, and destroy the enemy's cavalry and guerrillas.

The troops at Murfreesborough, consisting of Hazen's brigade and Cox's battery, are also under your command for that purpose. This will enable you when desirable to organize a mixed active corps of cavalry, artillery, and infantry, which will be very effective. A train of 100 wagons will be attached to your command to enable you on occa-