War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0309 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, August 11, 1862.

Brigadier-General BOYLE,

Louisville, Ky.:

That part of Kentucky west of the Tennessee River is under the command of Major-General Grant. You will exercise no authority there.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WASHINGTON, D. C., August 11, 1862.

Brigadier-General QUINBY,

Columbus, Ky.:

General Boyle has no authority to give your orders, and you will not recognize his authority.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WASHINGTON, D. C., August 11, 1862.

Gov. DAVID TOD,

Columbus, Ohio:

I am directed by the Secretary of War to say that General Boyle is not authorized to make any requisition on you for troops.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

LOUISVILLE, KY., August 11, 1862-10.10 p.m.

Major-General HALLECK:

GENERAL: I have just received dispatch from Governor Tod that he is ordered not to send troops into Kentucky without your special order. General Buell telegraphed Governor Morton and Governor Tod to send me troops. General Morgan asked me to re-enforce Richmond and London to protect his rear and his trains. I have no force to do this unless supplied. General Nelson, at McMinnville, through General Wood, telegraphs that the rebel Morgan left Sparta on the 9th instant with 1,800 cavalry and four pieces of artillery for Kentucky. I have no adequate force to whip or catch the rascal until the new cavalry are mounted and armed. Governor Morton promised to send four regiments this week. I have no doubt [J. H.] Morgan's purpose is to make the raid. If the rebels have the 15,000 in front of General [George W.] Morgan and the 60,000 at Knoxville, as stated in his dispatch to the Secretary of War, many troops would be needed in Kentucky.

J. T. BOYLE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

ROSECRANS' HEADQUARTERS,

Near Corinth, Miss., August 11, 1862-3 p.m.

Major-General HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

Went to Tuscumbia yesterday. The Tennessee Valley, for 70 miles long and from 5 to 7 wide, is one immense corn field. The rebels are not in force on that line, but there is active cavalry force opposite Courtland. A spy, sent from here to Tupelo and Grenada, just in, confirms