War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0303 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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will see that the steamers are not exposed to seizure and that preparations are made to fire them instantly if it should be attempted. Under no circumstances should the steamers lie at Florence. Still I am pretty well satisfied that the plan was suddenly changed and that the attack will come from East Tennessee; indeed there are already indications that it is about to be attempted.

I apprehend that I shall have to call on you very soon for the two divisions General Halleck informed me you would place at my disposal. Whose are they and where? Eastport would be the best point for them to cross, and they should be prepared to move at na hour's notice and rapidly. I suppose of course they are organized with cavalry and artillery, and are guarding 500 miles of railroad, which is swarming with the enemy's cavalry, regular and irregular.

There has been much trouble with the road beyond Decatur; it can be kept open against any cavalry force if the bridges are protected with a stockade and guard, and not otherwise. i think it is well worth it for both of us.

Please preserve secrecy in regard to the letter. Answer in telegraph cipher.

D. C. BUELL.

HEADQUARTERS,

Huntsville, August 10, 1862.

Colonel HARKER,

Stevenson:

Send back Mrs. Cole's slaves, Zack and John, who are employed on public work, to take care of the place, there being no hands left for the purpose.

D. C. BUELL.

HEADQUARTERS,

Huntsville, August 10, 1862.

Brigadier General J. D. MORGAN,

Tuscumbia:

I send cipher dispatches for General Grant. Have you any information of the strength and movements of the enemy south of you? It has been in their plans to cross into Middle Tennessee from about your position. I hardly think it can be now. At all events the greatest care should be practiced against such an attempt. The steamer and barges should not under any circumstances be allowed to lie at Florence, and every preparation should be made to burn them in case you should have to abandon them. The trouble on the railroad can be prevented against any cavalry force by guarding the bridges and building stockades, and not otherwise; I think it worth the trouble.

Please answer in cipher by my courier, with such information as you may have.

D. C. BUELL.

TUSCUMBIA, August 10, 1862.

Major-General BUELL:

Your dispatch just received. A force of cavalry has been moving across our front from west of Franklin to Moulton, variously estimated from 1,500 to 3,000 men. Small guerrilla parties have troubled us considerably on the east end of the line, principally between Courtland and Decatur. By letter to-day from Lieutenant-Colonel Bradley, commanding