War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0295 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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held, being necessary to effect the arrangement, should be forwarded with the application. No such application will be approved where the capture has resulted from neglect or misbehavior on the part of the prisoner or of the command to which he belonged.

The evidence of a lawful parole will be the parole itself, bearing the approval of the commanding general.

The same rule will be observed by this army in paroling prisoners taken from the enemy. If they cannot be held until the sanction of such officer as the general commanding the enemy's forces may designate for that purpose is obtained they will be released.

By command of Major-General Buell:

JAMES B. FRY,

Colonel and Chief of Staff.

CUMBERLAND GAP, August 8, 1862.

Colonel J. B. FRY:

Two more scouts have come in, confirming information before received, and with this additional intelligence, that two trains of soldiers had arrived from East Tennessee at Morrison. I am satisfied that the enemy has at least 20,000 men between this point and Knoxville. New recruits would be assigned to the defense of trenches or the construction of works.

GEORGE W. MORGAN,

General.

HEADQUARTERS, Huntsville, August 8, 1862.

General MORGAN, Cumberland Gap:

Your information in reference to movement of troops toward Knoxville is confirmed by our accounts from Chattanooga. This may be in consequence of our advance to McMinnville and Pelham and your late move on Tazewell, or it may be in intention to attack your position. You must be prepared for the letter, and push you intrenchments and get in supplies with all possible dispatch.

JAMES B. FRY,

Chief of Staff.

CUMBERLAND GAP, August 8, 1862.

Colonel J. B. FRY:

Have received a communication from General Stevenson, commanding First Division of the enemy's forces, proposing an exchange. He had 1 captain and 50 privates. I have 1 lieutenant-colonel, 1 lieutenant, and 9 privates. What is the scale of exchange? I have to lament the death of Captain Edgar; it is a severe loss, for he had no superior of his rank.

GEORGE W. MORGAN,

General.

HEADQUARTERS, Huntsville, August 8, 1862.

General MORGAN, Cumberland Gap:

Have ordered rule of exchange of prisoners be sent you from Nashville. If you are in a hurry, arrange it to suit yourself.

JAMES B. FRY.