War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0265 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS, Huntsville, August 5, 1862.

General MORGAN, Cumberland Gap:

General Buell will be glad if you can get artillery companies from Illinois or elsewhere. Have you any arms for East Tennessee? If so, how many?

JAMES B. FRY.

LOUISVILLE, August 5, 1862-2.45 p.m.

Hon. E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

If I had the arms I could put into service two cavalry regiments at once; one for three years and one for one year. Recruiting for cavalry satisfactory; much slower for infantry. Mr. Speaker Buckner has been and is too much alarmed; not the slightest danger of Frankfort. All is quiet over the State, except in locations where small guerrilla bands are forming. Election everywhere heard from passed off quietly. Union men elected everywhere except in few counties. I will send off the traitors who may be elected. The falsehoods of our domestic traitor have produced the alarm. If permitted I will drive them out.

J. T. BOYLE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS, Huntsville, August 5, 1862.

General NEGLEY, Columbia:

The Culleoka trestle, 1,000 feet long, near Pleasant Grove Station, about 10 miles south of Columbia is not guarded. Send a company to each end of the Culleoka trestle at once, with orders in regard to stockades, &c. You must guard the road between Pulaski and Nashville. It is not necessary to keep two companies at Franklin.

JAMES B. FRY.

HUNTSVILLE, ALA., August 6, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

The creation of a sub-district, to include Kentucky, Ohio, and Indiana, and perhaps Illinois, would be a good arrangement, especially with a view to the organizing of troops from the States to meet any emergency that my require more troops in Kentucky and Tennessee. If adopted I wold like Major General W. T. Sherman to command it, both because of his fitness and because no officer that I now have can be spared. If the place is to be made for the benefit of an individual I advise that it be not done. I see no cause to be dissatisfied with General Morgan. I consider that he has conducted his command successfully and I see not reason to change him.

D. C. BUELL,

Major-General.