War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0242 KY., M. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXVIII.

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BATTLE CREEK, August 1, 1862.

General BUELL:

Howard's Alabama regiment* crossed at Chattanooga on Wednesday evening, and were at Potts' Cross-Roads, between Dunlap and Pikeville. Yesterday another regiment crossed. Four hundred were also detailed yesterday to work on the Anderson road. The country opposite me was covered again with tents this morning; now, at 12.30, they are nearly all struck. They say they are bound for Nashville.

McCOOK,

Brigadier-General.

COLUMBIA, August 1, 1862.

Colonel J. B. FRY:

Am reliably informed of a concerted movement on Tennessee River west of Florence. It is reported that a gunboat is aground near Perry; it is intended to capture this boat by a surprise. There is no doubt of a meditated plan to concentrate a force near Perry for some object.

JAS. S. NEGLEY,

Brigadier-General.

COLUMBIA, August 1, 1862.

Colonel J. B. FRY:

Anderson's guerrillas, 50 strong, encamped 9 miles south last night, were near Mount Pleasant to-day. They carried off several Union men. Cooper's guerrillas, 80 to 100, were 9 miles west of Leatherwood. I trust you will see the necessity of placing at my disposal a cavalry force sufficient to disperse these bands before they do serious mischief.

JAS. S. NEGLEY.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE OHIO,

Nashville, August 1, 1862.

Colonel J. B. FRY,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff:

COLONEL: I beg leave to report to the commanding general the substance of a conversation held at this office with Governor Andrew Johnson yesterday. The conversation was protracted, and on the part of the Governor deeply earnest, and the main points were supported by considerable detail.

The Governor is so informed as to have adopted the conviction that an attempt will be made very soon by the rebels to repossess themselves of this State, and that they consider the possession of the capital a necessary incident. He believes that if they should succeed the moral and physical consequence would be disastrous to our cause, and that therefore means to the contrary should be applied which would defeat their designs beyond a peradventure. He is satisfied that the enemy has numerous secret adherents who in a crisis would give them aid, particularly should there be prospect of their success without great sacrifices; but that many of these are not ready for considerable sacrifices, and would be deterred if they were sure these sacrifices would follow.

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*The Third Confederate Cavalry.

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