War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0233 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS,

Huntsville, July 30, 1862.

Brigadier General S. S. FRY, Pulaski:

March your brigade by the most direct route to Decherd, beyond Winchester. Start to-morrow and take six days' rations. Get your forage on the route. Occupy four days in going.

JAMES B. FRY,

Chief of Staff.

TUSCUMBIA, July 30, 1862.

Lieutenant-Colonel BRADLEY:

Commanding Fifty-first Illinois:

I have received reliable information that there is a large force of infantry, cavalry, and artillery forming in your front. Your intrenchments are not sufficiently strong to resist artillery. If you should ascertain from what you consider reliable sources that an attack in force was to be made on your command you will retreat to his point by the road north of the railroad. You will see the necessity of constantly keeping your teams loaded and your command ready to move at a moment's warning. The cavalry must see to it that you are kept informed of the movements of the enemy as far as possible. If you should find it impossible to retire in this direction you will retreat to the north side of the river and join the forces at this point. A night movement is preferable, as it conceals your direction. Keep me fully informed of everything that transpires in your direction. If forced to move it may be necessary to destroy some property. Do so rather than have it fall into the hands of the enemy. Inform the cavalry if forced to retire, and you must obtain your supplies from the country surrounding you.

F. A. HARRINGTON,

Colonel, Commanding First Brigade.

COLUMBIA, [July] 30, 1862.

Colonel J. B. FRY:

Anderson's guerrilla party burned the depot at Culleoka last night and robbed Dr. Thompson of $650.

JAS. S. NEGLEY,

Brigadier-General.

COLUMBIA, July 30, 1862.

Colonel J. B. FRY:

Reports from negroes and Union citizens indicate an early attack by the guerrillas upon the weak posts along this line. A party from Hickman, numbering over 100, came to our stock pasture last night, 4 miles distant, and drove off 50 animals. The country is swarming with guerrillas. West of this they have grown exceedingly bold since I have been deprived of the means of pursuing them. I am just informed that some officers stopped the building of the stockades according to my directions and ordered them to be built otherwise. If any officer has the right to change my orders without informing me, it of course relieves me from responsibility.

JAS. S. NEGLEY.