War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0205 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

terminus od railroad. Transportation will require a great protection. Its importance as supply depot is the only reason why I except it may be in danger.

No appearance of enemy about here. My train was fired into day before yesterday by citizens, not soldiers, at Elkton.

EDWARD M. McCOOK.

HEADQUARTERS,

Huntsville, July 23, 1862.

Colonel McCOOK, Reynolds' Station:

It is reported that the enemy, 500 strong, was marching south through Marshall County last night. Wolford's cavalry is just ordered to march south from Columbia and form junction with your regiment, and both then to move to within 5 or 6 miles of Reynolds', and move upon the enemy wherever he may be and attack and pursue. Board's cavalry at Columbia ready to re-enforce or act on the rear.

Send a messenger after your regiment to halt it till Wolford's comes down. Get all information you can and report and be prepared for vigorous action. Notify infantry below you and look out for trains.

JAMES B. FRY,

Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS,

Huntsville, July 23, 1862.

General McCOOK, Battle Creek:

Send General Johnson here in person by next train. Bring his horses for active service.

JAMES B. FRY,

Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE OHIO,

Nashville, July 23, 1862.

Colonel J. B. FRY:

Asst. Adjt. Ge., Chief of Staff, Huntsville, Ala.:

Have no knowledge that organized bodies of men re-enforce Forrest, though he boasts of expecting them, so as to get Nashville on Saturday night. Morgan may possibly join him. I meant individual accessions, as reported by Union men and our men returned paroled after capture and detention-in one day 40 in Lebanon, in another 50 in La Vergne. Colonel Miller can count 200 of whom he has knowledge. On the road many mounted men are seen going toward Forrest, reasonably supposed to be his recruits, and the country people are openly exultant. There is negro testimony that the roads from Knoxville and East Tennessee toward this region are lined with men, seemingly recruits. This is not corroborated. Last night our scouts saw nothing of the enemy within 10 miles. Train started for Louisville this morning presumed all right, though yesterday's did not come in. Nothing heard to-day from Colonel Boone.

W. H. SIDELL,

Major, Fifteenth Infantry, Actg. Asst. Adjt. General