War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0202 KY., M. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXVIII.

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CUMBERLAND GAP, July 22, 1862.

Colonel J. B. FRY:

COLONEL: In a short time there will be forty siege guns here and no cannoneers to work them, and our field batteries are short, as follows, viz: The First Michigan requires 10 men; the First Wisconsin, 30 men; and the Ninth Ohio, 68 men. I respectfully request that in the next levies, now being organized, a sufficient artillery force may be sent here to man the work-at least two additional batteries of artillery. The brigade of Spears has gone to the rear. It is removed that Magruder succeeds Kirby Smith.

GEORGE W. MORGAN,

CUMBERLAND GAP, July 22, 1862.

Colonel J. B. FRY:

Lieutenant Craighill, military engineer, has telegraphed to General Totten strongly recommending that a military road be immediately constructed from Crab Orchard to this place, and the quartermaster of this division be instructed to contract for working the same, at a cost not to exceed $150,000. The work should be under the supervision of a United States engineer. Without such a road it will be impossible to hold this position after the rainy weather sects in, as the country for 100 miles to the rear is low and the country in front will soon be entirely exhausted.

GEORGE W. MORGAN,

General.

HUNTSVILLE, ALA.,

July 23, 1862-1.30 a.m.

General HALLECK, or

General THOMAS, Adjutant-General:

I cannot err in repeating to you the urgent importance of a large cavalry force in this district. The enemy is throwing an immense cavalry force on the 400 miles of railroad communication upon which this army is dependent for supplies. I am building stockades to hold from 30 to 100 men at all bridges, but such guards at best only give security to certain points and against a small force. There can be no safety without cavalry enough to pursue the enemy in large bodies. Twice already our roads have been broken up by their formidable raids, causing great delay and embarrassment, so that we are barely able to resist from day to day. I am concentrating all the cavalry I can spare to operate actively in force. I don't pretend to know whether you have cavalry that you can spare elsewhere, but, if so, it can find abundant and very important service here.

D. C. BUELL,

Major-General, Commanding.

NASHVILLE, July 23, 1862.

Colonel J. B. FRY:

Your dispatch of yesterday just received. I have ordered regiment brought up by first train to-day. Four trains of this have just passed