War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0199 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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COLUMBIA, July 22, 1862.

Major-General BUELL:

I have just received the following dispatch from Colonel Miller. Have you any instructions in the premises?

General NEGLEY:

Enemy, 2,000 or 2,500 strong, burned the Mill Creek Bridge yesterday evening; camped 12 miles from here, on Murfreesborough road. Started this morning toward Murfreesborough in pursuit of wagon train with 360 Indiana troops, who were on road to Murfreesborough about 12 miles this side. Colonel Boone, Gallatin, [telegraphs] that enemy were at Richland Station 1,000 strong, and he wants re-enforcements. Can you send me re-enforcements? If so, how many men?

JNumbers F. MILLER,

Colonel, Commanding Post Nashville.

JAS. S. NEGLEY,

General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Huntsville, July 22, 1862.

General NEGLEY, Columbia:

For the present you must not move any troops which are posted south of Columbia. You must protect the railroad from Columbia to Nashville. The line is now threatened from the east by cavalry. Throw out your cavalry and drive them off if they approach. Defend bridges to the last extremity.

JAMES B. FRY,

Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS,

Huntsville, July 22, 1862.

General NEGLEY, Columbia:

Don't confine your cavalry to mere defense; put a little life into it and destroy the marauding bands that hover about you.

D. C. BUELL.

HEADQUARTERS,

Huntsville, July 22, 1862.

General NEGLEY, Columbia:

There is reason to believe that Chapel Hill, between Franklin and Shelbyville, is a point through which the rebel cavalry will pass, and they may be there now. Ascertain to-night, and, it so, watch him and satisfy yourself which way he moves. It may be his intention tog move to the east via Shelbyville or to move on our supplies and trains at Reynolds'. If the last should be the case, take your cavalry and artillery and form a junction with troops at Reynolds' Station. It is expected that your stockades at Duck River Bridge will secure that in case you move your cavalry and artillery, the town being of small importance compared with the bridge.

JAMES B. FRY.

COLUMBIA, July 22, 1862.

Major-General BUELL:

By pursuing your advice has been our safety. The First Kentucky Cavalry has exhibited great endurance and determination. The enemy