War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0192 KY., M. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXVIII.

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ROSECRANS' HEADQUARTERS, July 20, 1862.

Major-General THOMAS:

Paine's division, Morgan commanding, leaves at 6 a. m. to-morrow. Will reach Burnsville to-morrow night and next day be at Iuka. Should the story of troops at Bay Springs threatening Jacinto or Iuka prove groundless by Wednesday I will come up. Will you have left before then and where do you cross? What news from Buell?

W. S. ROSECRANS.

HEADQUARTERS,

Huntsville, July 20, 1862.

General GEORGE W. MORGAN,

Cumberland Gap:

Your services are so essential at this time in your present position that General Buell cannot consent to dispense with them, and hopes the cause for offering your resignation will pass away. The general does not undertake to decide what troops or how many it will be best for you to put on your line, but leaves it to your judgment. It is desirable not to reduce your strength more than is absolutely necessary, as you may be called upon to assume the offensive at any moment. General Carter cannot be spared at this time. Is Lieutenant Craighill an officer of the Regular Army, and when did he arrive and under what orders?

JAMES B. FRY,

Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO,

Huntsville, July 20, 1862.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR BRIDGE GUARDS.

Wherever stockades are not already erected the guard will at once erect them in positions suitable for protecting the bridge. The camp of the guard should be near, but not habitually within the stockade. A barrel of water must at all times be kept in the stockade. One or more sentinels, according to the importance of that structure, must at all times be kept over the bridge or other property guarded. Under no plea whatever shall these sentinels slacken their vigilance by day or night.

The entire guard shall continue at their posts at all times except when absent for a necessary purpose, and the whole force shall turn out train has passed, as this is the time when an attack may be expected. They shall also turn out under arms at daylight. Under no pretext should any member of the guard sleep or spend the night outside of the stockade, except the sentinels on post.

The commander of the guard will acquaint himself with the approaches to his position and the country immediately around it, and will at all times be on the alert.

The bridges or other points put under guard must be defended to the last extremity, and no excuse can be regarded as satisfactory for a surprise, a weak defense, or a surrender.