War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0179 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS,

Huntsville, July 18, 1862.

General NEGLEY, Columbia:

The companies of the Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania should have marched and not waited three days for cars. General Nelson's authority to command was to meet an emergency. Report the position of Board's and Wolford's cavalry and the other troops near you at this time. What condition is Board's regiment in?

JAMES B. FRY.

HEADQUARTERS,

Hunstville, July 18, 1862.

General NELSON,

Nashville or Murfreesborough:

We have an object in Tennessee of far greater importance to the Union and to Kentucky than driving Morgan out of Kentucky and you cannot be spared. I shall endeavor to be prepared for the time when you are more necessary there than here, and there is no one to whom I would intrust the duty with more confidence. In the mean time push forward with what we have to do here.

D. C. BUELL.

HEADQUARTERS,

Huntsville, July 18, 1862.

General NELSON, Murfreesborough:

I have ordered the Twenty-third Brigade, under Colonel Matthews, to report to you. I meant that Jackson's cavalry, with the battery which is with it, should also report, but they got out of position. I will order others. The Twenty-third Brigade and the battery are to remain at Murfreesborough to support your advance and protect the railroad. As soon as they arrive move at once to McMinnville with one brigade, one battery, and the cavalry. They must be strongly posted. Practice the strictest discipline and vigilance, and for the present be employed to prevent inroads upon the line of railroad or the movement of the enemy in that vicinity. The supplies should be kept at the railroad depot or near by, and a small intrenched work thrown up to guard both and protect a small force of, say, two or four companies, so as to have the remaining force free to move on any direction without danger to its supplies. The railroad will be opened as soon as possible to that point, which amy become a depot for further operations. The remainder of your division will move in a few days. I will inform you of the disposition of other troops affecting your position. Carry forward five days' reserved supplies. Purchase forage it possible. Take as little baggage and as small a train as possible. Send back the supply train as soon as you arrive. You will probably have to use your cavalry more in your rear than in your front.

D. C. BUELL.

TULLAHOMA, July 18, 1962.

Colonel J. B. FRY:

I am informed that 10,000 or 15,000 pounds of bacon, 2,500 bushels of wheat, 1,000 bushels of corn, and 200 head beef cattle can be obtained