War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0177 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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because it was connected with my base, but because I was the senior officer commanding troops in Kentucky.

Lieutenant Craighill, engineer, has had for three days a heavy force occupied in cleaning the hills and ravines preparatory to fortifying. He has made a requisition, in obedience to his instructions from his chief, for thirty pieces of heavy caliber. It is his opinion that when the works are completed it will require at least 5,000 men to hold the position if vigorously attacked. When the fortifications are completed there should be, in my judgment, a garrison of one regiment of artillery, 5,000 infantry, and at least 500 cavalry. I have immediate use for two additional companies of artillery. Andrew's battery is still, I understand, at the mouth of Salt River.

GEORGE W. MORGAN,

Brigadier-General.

HUNTSVILLE, ALA., July 18, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

I ask authority to arrange with the Governor of Pennsylvania for raising three companies of cavalry, to be united with the independent company raised last fall in Pennsylvania by special authority of the War Department, and known as the Anderson Troop, Captain Palmer. This company is composed of superior men, many of them well qualified for officers; and by appointing them as officers in the proposed companies the force could be speedily rendered efficient. It is quite certain, from the reputation of Captain Palmer and the troop, that the companies can be speedily raised. I would ask for the proposed force the battalion organization. The necessity for an increase in our cavalry force is imperative and time is important.

D. C. BUELL,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Huntsville, July 18, 1862.

J. B. ANDERSON, Nashville:

If you have not sent your men to the Decatur road to will be best to put the whole force on the Murfreesborough. Will it not be better at any rate? The whole regiment of Engineers is on the Decatur road.

D. C. BUELL.

COLUMBIA, July 18, 1862.

Major-General BUELL:

Railroad bridge over Duck river is impassable; cannot be repaired until river falls; if it rises now it will be swept away. Train not heard from. Citizens report 300 rebels between this and Franklin. My scouts have chased a number of small squads, but as yet met no force.

JAS. S. NEGLEY.

HEADQUARTERS,

Huntsville, July 18, 1862.

General NEGLEY, Columbia:

From what cause is the bridge over Duck River impassable? How

12 R R-VOL XVI, PT II