War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0153 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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every effort to obtain reliable information promptly, and will at once and constantly afterward communicate the result to you. From the frequent arrival of the cars at the point opposite to me it is evident that active intercourse is kept up between it and Chattanooga, but for what purpose I am yet ignorant; I will soon ascertain.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant.

T. L. CRITTENDEN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS,

Huntsville, July 15, 1862.

General CRITTENDEN, Battle Creek:

It is hardly worth while to destroy the trestle now, and if desirable it may be better to do it at a later day. Use all means of getting information. I am particularly anxious to hear from the direction of Tracy City and McMinnville.

D. C. BUELL.

HEADQUARTERS,

Huntsville, July 15, 1862.

General SMITH,

Cowan, or Elsewhere on Chattanooga Road:

You have doubtless by this time taken your positions and ascertained something of the movements of the enemy. If he has not shown himself in force push forward a reconnaissance toward Murfreesborough. Keep an engine and what cars you think necessary near you for express or other service. You ought to have had cars also. What is the bridge party doing? How far is it out to the first break on the McMinnville road? The enemy has made no advance in force toward Nashville or elsewhere that we can hear of. Was burying dead and removing prisoners yesterday evening. Report how you find matters.

D. C. BUELL.

NASHVILLE, July 15, 1862.

Colonel J. B. FRY:

Will come to Huntsville as soon as I can leave here. My bridge men were, when last heard from, at Tullahoma and Elk River, on Chattanooga road; they are without provisions. Can they be taken to Huntsville via Stevenson by rail? I cannot communicate with them, and to not know whether trains run from Stevenson to Tullahoma.

J. B. ANDERSON.

NASHVILLE, July 15, 1862.

Colonel J. B. FRY:

No supplies forwarded yesterday or day before. Have ordered some forward to Reynold's to-day. No supplies have been received from Louisville for several days until yesterday, when 11 car loads of forage came. This I forward to-day to Reynolds'. A large portion of the 50,000 rations of forage forwarded to Murfreesborough by Captain Nigh has been captured or burned. Mr. Anderson saved one train on Sunday. Colonel Swords answers my requisitions for supplies that they will be sent as soon as transportation can be furnished at Louisville.

J. D. BINGHAM.