War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0150 KY.,M. AND E.TENN.,N.ALA., AND SW.VA. Chapter XXVIII.

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is that the cavalry forces may pass to the rear of any force I can concentrate and so cut us off from our supplies. If their force is no larger than reported we can beat them. Will Jackson come up to our line? Was there any rebel artillery or infantry at Murfreesborough?

W. S. SMITH,

Brigadier General.

HUNTSVILLE, July 14, 1862.

General WILLIAM S. SMITH:

The enemy had no artillery, but took Hewett's battery. Defeat the enemy. Let me know where you are and the supplies shall not be entirely wanting. Jackson will be at Fayetteville to-night.

D. C. BUELL,

Major-General.

CUMBERLAND GAP, July 14, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON:

On the 11th of last May I respectfully requested that two regiments of cavalry should be stationed along the line of the railroad between Louisville and Nashville, and that a similar force should occupy the line from Lexington to my camp at Cumberland Ford. Had that been taken Morgan's present raid would not have taken place. He will possibly try to cut me off from base of supplies and my succeed for a few days, as it is possible that he may be put to operate in my rear while Smith advance in front. No serious evil can result to us in either respect, but I again respectfully state that my command is powerless from want of cavalry. Holding this Gap amounts to nothing if we simply remain here to eat rations. The enemy's cavalry is destroying everything in front and I have not the means to pursue it. With 5,000 men to hold this position and a reasonable sized column for the field I could sweep East Tennessee of every rebel soldier.

GEORGE W. MORGAN.

CUMBERLAND GAP, July, 14, 1862.

Colonel J. B. FRY:

Your telegram is just received. I have known for two days that my line of communication was in danger, but I am powerless from want of cavalry. On the 11th of May I respectfully suggested that two regiments of cavalry should be stationed along the line of road from Louisville to Nashville and that a similar force should protect my communication with Lexington. The enemy has 1,500 cavalry in my immediate front, while I have scarcely sufficient for picket duty.

GEORGE W. MORGAN,

Brigadier-General.

CORINTH, July 5, 1862.

The PRESIDENT:

General Grant has just arrived from Memphis. I am in communication with General Buell and Governor Johnson in Tennessee. Hope to