War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0126 KY.,M. AND E.TENN.,N.ALA., AND SW.VA. Chapter XXVIII.

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WARTRACE, July 11, 1862.

Colonel J. B. FRY:

Dispatches received. Have sent out two companies of cavalry on the Manchester road - that being the route which will be most likely taken - with instructions to scour the country. One company of my command is at Shelbyville; also three companies Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry. Do I understand that I am to notify the commanders of the captures? Major Wynkoop has not received a dispatch, though at a telegraph station (Shelbyville) where there is an operator.

H. A. HAMBRIGHT,

Colonel.

NASHVILLE, July 11, 1862.

Colonel LESTER,

Commanding Murfreesborough:

The following dispatch just received from Major Ballard, commanding at Lebanon, date yesterday:

We have just learned from reliable sources that Colonel John H. Morgan is at Gordonsville, 22 miles from this place, with 2,000 cavalry, threatening this point. It is anticipated the attack will be

to-night or to-morrow morning.

A. S. BALLAD,

Major, Commanding.

The forces at Lebanon are four companies infantry, two companies cavalry. If re-enforcements are necessary there they must go from Murfreesborough. We have not the troops here.

Communicate this to the commanding officer, now on way to your place, with the request he will act as his judgment may dictate. Lebanon must be held if possible. John H. Royal, from McMinnville, are marching to McMinnville from Chattanooga, represented as Hardee's brigade, and the people of McMinnville preparing to receive them kindly. Royal appears to be honestly Union. He left McMinnville the 9th. This may be important.

JNO. F. MILLER,

Colonel, Commanding Post.

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, DISTRICT OF THE OHIO, Tuscumbia, Ala.,

July 11, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Corinth:

I shall send out a command to-morrow below Newburg, on the Moulton road, to get behind the rebel cavalry said to be encamped there, and then send another force from Courtland to drive them south, by which maneuver I hope to catch some of them at least.

Do you wish Eastport broken up entirely? I will have all the Government property away from there in the days.

Winston is in very feeble health, and has pledged me his word of honor that he has not communicated with the rebel army since the evacuation of Corinth and will not attempt to do so in future. I accordingly released him.

The telegraph wire was cut beyond Courtland three days ago, but hope to have it repaired by to-morrow morning.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General, U. S. Volunteers.