War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0089 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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CORINTH, July 2, 1862.

The PRESIDENT:

The enemy attacked us at Booneville yesterday in considerable force, but were driven back. Particulars not yet received. On the line to Memphis they attacked a train and destroyed eight wagons.

According to reports of scouts and deserters Bragg is preparing to attack us with the whole force of Beauregard's army. Under these circumstances I do not think I could safely be absent from my army, although, being somewhat broken in health and wearied out by long months of labor and care, a trip to Washington would be exceedingly desirable.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Huntsville, July 2, 1862-10 p.m.

General HALLECK:

A railroad engineer who left Chattanooga Saturday night last says it was currently reported that Beauregard passed through Atlanta last Thursday en route to Richmond, and that his troops have been following via Dalton and Cleveland ever since.

D. C. BUELL,

Major-General.

CORINTH, MISS., July 2, 1862.

Major-General BUELL,

Huntsville:

General Beauregard did pass through Montgomery and Atlanta, but was accompanied only by his staff. A railroad conductor, a deserter, says he afterward saw him in Mobile, where he published a letter denying any losses in the evacuation of Corinth. All deserters, spies, and prisoners deny that any troops have gone East, except a body of cavalry sent across the country to impress conscripts and take them to Chattanooga. The stampede at Washington resulted from false reports. They now say that McClellan has suffered no serious reverses. I am surprised that General Mitchel has sent no locomotive and cars across the river at Decatur after being ordered by Secretary of War and telegraphing me that he was doing so. Moreover, Colonel Swords has sent only two of the six ordered from Louisville and those almost useless. This neglect had entirely crippled our transportation.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Huntsville, July 2, 1862.

General HALLECK:

I did not know that the transfer of engines had been ordered, but with that view I made inquiry yesterday morning as to the time it would take. I was told by the engineer that it would take three days to cross one and that rope, which would be necessary, was not here; and on receiving your dispatch about abandoning the route I supposed it would not be desirable to make the transfer. I will have it done now if you