War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0082 KY., M. AND E.TENN., N.ALA., AND SW.VA. Chapter XXVIII.

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you. Either the Chattanooga expedition must be postponed or a less force sent to Washington, or we have left the alternative of losing much that we have gained here in the West.

To surrender any territory we have acquired is certain death to all Union men in that territory. Any loss on our part will be followed by insurrection in Tennessee and Kentucky and we shall find still greater difficulty in the pacification of those States than we have encountered in Missouri.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

CORINTH, July 1, 1862. (Received 9.40 p.m.)

The PRESIDENT:

Your telegram, just received, saves Western Tennessee; the former order was imperative, and I had no alternative but obedience. The enemy is undoubtedly preparing to attack some point of our lines, supposing our forces diminished. I immediately ordered them all back to their posts. If these troops had been sent East we should have been defeated or forced to retreat.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General, Commanding.

CORINTH, July 1, 1862-8.45 a.m. (Received 9.40 p.m.)

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Telegram suspending orders for troops is received. If order had been carried out we should have been either defeated or forced to retreat. No forces can be spared at present. The enemy is apparently preparing to make an attack and his guerrillas have already done us considerable damage.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General, Commanding.

CORINTH, July 1, 1862.

Major-General BUELL,

Huntsville, Ala.:

It is impossible to send you another locomotive. Colonel Swords in a whole month has sent us only two, and one of those unfit for use. Two of those fitted up here have been smashed up by guerrillas destroying the track.

We shall be obliged to give up the line to Memphis and withdraw the troops, as we have no rolling stock to supply them. I certainly expected that General Mitchel would send us some by Decatur instead of being called upon to send any in that direction. The withdrawal of the larger part of Grant's army to Washington may compel us to abandon West Tennessee.

When can you get your supplies by way of Nashville? The orders from Washington seem to me most inconsiderate. We have now to apprehend serious insurrections in Nashville, Tenn.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.