War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0074 KY., M. AND E.TENN., N.ALA., AND SW.VA. Chapter XXVIII.

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HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, DISTRICT OF THE OHIO,

Tuscumbia, Ala., June 29, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK,

Corinth, Miss.:

Arrived here to-day at 11 a.m. Find all three of the engines disabled; the depot empty of forage and subsistence.

Please order two good engines sent up immediately. They should be here to-morrow morning early or else the troops here and in advance will suffer.

I understand there is a printing press here that has not been seized. If you wish it I will have it sent to you.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General, U. S. Volunteers.

TUSCUMBIA, June 29, 1862.

Major-General MITCHEL:

All three of the engines between this and Corinth have broken down. It is impossible to say when any forage can be sent to Decatur until I can get good engines from you. Supplies from Eastport are being shipped to Iuka by my train as rapidly as possible.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

No. 38. Corinth, Miss., June 29, 1862.

I. All Government vessels and all vessels in the Government service navigating the Cumberland, Tennessee, Mississippi, Arkansas, and White Rivers will receive, protect, and deliver such mails as may be put on board of them by postmasters or other agents of the Post-Office Department for points on the lines of their transit until permanent arrangements for mail transportation can be made. The mails so received will be under the immediate care of agents of the Post-Office Department.

II. The regular daily trains on all railroads in this department under military control will also afford all proper facilities, as above directed, for carrying the mails.

By command of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CORINTH, June 30, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Your telegraph of the 28th is just received, but it is so imperfect that parts of it cannot be deciphered till repeated. The object, however, is understood and measures will be immediately taken to carry it out. The condition of the river and railroads in Tennessee and the want of rolling stock will render the movement very slow.

Cavalry cannot be sent, and it will be exceedingly difficult to transport artillery with horses and guns. If artillerymen are sent can they be supplied with horses and guns there or shall I send infantry only?