War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0073 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS,

Huntsville, June 29, 1862.

General THOMAS,

Tuscumbia:

Put all the teams of your supply and baggage train not wanted for immediate use to hauling supplies from Eastport to Iuka. The wish is to get the stores up from Eastport and on the railroad, where they can be forwarded at any moment.

JAMES B. FRY,

Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS,

Huntsville, June 29, 1862.

Colonel THOMAS SWORDS,

Nashville (if not there sent to Louisville):

You must see that the Louisville and Nashville Railroad is prepared at all times for the present to transport forage and rations at the rate of 200 tons a day, and these supplies must be sent forward in the proportion of one pound of subsistence stores to three and half pounds of forage. These stores should come direct through to Nashville and over the Nashville and Decatur Railroad. You must see that the Louisville and Nashville and the Nashville and Decatur roads transport supplies at this rate, exclusive of extra stores, as clothing, ordnance, and the like. It is thought that in about ten days the supplies may be sent by the Chattanooga road. The depot in Nashville should keep enough supplies on hand to furnish the troops on Chattanooga Railroad north of Elk River. I presume they do so now. Acknowledge receipt.

JAMES B. FRY,

Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS,

Huntsville, June 29, 1862.

Captain BINGHAM,

Nashville:

There is no forage at Huntsville, Athens, Elk River, or Reynolds Station except perhaps 900 sacks now in transit. Why is this? Send forward grain. We expected 150,000 rations of forage at Athens and found none. Answer.

JAMES B. FRY,

Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS,

Huntsville, June 29, 1862.

General THOMAS,

Tuscumbia:

General Buell directs that you put at least 200 wagons to hauling supplies from Eastport to Iuka. It is hoped that you can, while your troops are stationary, put 225 at this work. Enough rations for your own command must be hauled, and all the wagons not required for this must haul forage. This must give at least 150 wagon loads of forage a day. The forage must be sent forward by you to Decatur at the same rate it is hauled up and stored there, subject to orders from here. The two trains of cars you have will just about accomplish this work. Acknowledge receipt.

JAMES B. FRY,

Chief of Staff.