War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0053 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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division left Corinth this morning to re-enforce him. He will make a junction with General Mitchel and go to East Tennessee. General Grant has gone to Memphis. Pope's command and one or two divisions remain 4 to 8 miles south of Corinth. No other news.

A. STAGER.

CORINTH, June 23, 1862.

Major-General BUELL,

Florence:

News from Arkansas favorable. Our forces are clearing out White River and rebel Governor has fled from Little Rock. According to last advices Bragg has from 70,000 to 80,000 men at Tupelo and Okolona; 10,000 at Vicksburg and Jackson. A force, numbers not given, at Grenada and Panola have moved east from Aberdeen. I hear that Nelson has moved to Tuscumbia; if so, Thomas' division should not go east of Bear Creek for the present.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

CORINTH, MISS., June 23, 1862.

Major-General BUELL,

Florence:

From all accounts received here there seems to have been a culpable neglect in guarding the approaches to the railroad between Bear Creek and Tuscumbia. The matter should be investigated and the negligent officers held to a strict accountability. Such negligence cannot be overlooked.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

CORINTH, MISS., June 23, 1862.

Major-General BUELL,

Florence:

Send the prisoners wherever you may deem best. Governor Johnson telegraphs for two regiments of cavalry in Middle Tennessee. Perhaps Board's regiment, or the greater part of it, could be spared from Savannah. I know of no others available, not to I see the necessity of sending troops back to Middle Tennessee. No one will dare to get up an insurrection there now.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO,

Camp near Florence, June 23, 1862.

Brigadier-General CRITTENDEN,

Commanding Fifth Division:

General Buell directs that you have an estimate made of the amount of damage done to the property of the persons on whose plantations your camps are established, and that you have payment made for all the property, such as wood, rails used for fuel, standing crops, &c., from which our troops have derived benefit. The accounts must be made for the actual value of the items used and not for the prospective value of crops, and in the case of rails used for fuel, must show that it