War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0015 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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Orders, Numbers 88, you will facilitate your own supplies, as they can be taken by rail from here to any point on your line. The wagons can be repaired here and sent to you hereafter as you may require them. It is officially reported to me that some 200 of your wagons have been idle for some time.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

CORINTH, MISS., June 12, 1862.

Major-General BUELL:

Only one well quartermaster for duty at Pittsburg and not one here. I have not a single quartermaster or commissary to take charge of your extra stores, but will direct General Thomas to receive them for his division. I have asked time and again for quartermasters, but can get none, all having been absorbed by the Army of the Potomac.

Rest assured that I shall do everything in my power to facilitate your movement.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS, June 12, 1862.

General HALLECK:

The 200 wagons have been idle because their drivers went off and could not yet be replaced. We have got along without them because, our camps being changed only occasionally and for short distances, we have been able to use the baggage trains instead. The question is not so much what we require in the start as what we require when we get to the limit of the river railroad communication, say Stevenson, and what we need there will be needed as soon as we arrive if we are to go right on. They ought to go with the troops. The stores we have to turn over are in a good place, and if received there they could be issued as conveniently to the troops that remain here and our transportation at once released. I have directed the 200 teams at the landing to be turned over to Major Cross. The question of transportation is one of figures and facts, and I have so treated it in equipping my command.

D. C. BUELL,

HEADQUARTERS, June 12, 1862.

General HALLECK:

I have just seen the War Department order placing all paroled prisoners on leave of absence. The effect of course is virtually to disband them, but still allow them pay. We have some 1,500 at Nashville that have not been allowed to disperse; if they could be exchanged they might be put immediately.

D. C. BUELL.

HEADQUARTERS, June 12, 1862.

General HALLECK:

I have received the following dispatch from Mr. Anderson:

The Edgefield and Kentucky and Nashville and Northwestern Railroad Companies want their engines and cars returned. If General Halleck wants the 184 cars and 6