War of the Rebellion: Serial 021 Page 0921 Chapter XXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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[JANUARY.]

[Col. THOMAS GREEN:]

COLONEL: I send you some 15 men more by to-day's train. Am getting on smoothly; have no trouble except in getting corn to camp. Roads bad.

One of my paroled men, a German, has just come in from Cat Spring, a German settlement of this county, and reports that the Germans are embodying at Frelsburg for the avowed purpose of resisting the conscript and draft as State troops. They say the negroes are to be free, and that Jack Hamilton is in the country. They are supposed to number from 1,000 to 1,500. We are bound to have trouble with them, and the sooner the rebellion be crushed the better for them and the country.

The people of the county are holding meetings and collecting arms, believing themselves and property in great danger. Much excitement is evinced by the farmers along the river. They dread a concert on the part of the negroes. We have no arms and can be of little service.

Yours,

MCCOWN.

These reports are reliable. General Magruder should be informed of the facts.

MCCOWN.

On account of the difficulty of getting forage to camp, having to haul it some 12 or 15 miles, would recommend that the mules be sent to some neighborhood where forage is abundant and not to be hauled. Let me hear from you.

MCC.

JACKSON, MISS., January 1, 1863.

Lieutenant-General PEMBERTON, Vicksburg:

One of General Gardner's staff, just arrived, says that the general has accurate information from Baton Rouge, including numbers of regiments; force 10,000 or 11,000. All but three regiments are new. A regiment and battalion expected. General Gardner full of confidence.

J. E. JOHNSTON,

General.

JACKSON, MISS., January 1, 1863.

Lieutenant-General PEMBERTON, Vicksburg:

It would be safest to re-enforce Port Hudson by road. My information from Colonel Marigny and E. Hiriart, of New Orleans, is that no re-enforcement is necessary.

J. E. JOHNSTON,

General.

JACKSON, January 2, 1863.

Major-General GARDNER, Port Hudson:

I am told that you are confident with your present force. I hope it is so, for we can't afford more men than you want. If you require more say so.

J. E. JOHNSTON,

General.