War of the Rebellion: Serial 021 Page 0913 Chapter XXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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Richmond in pursuance of these orders on the day succeeding Captain Dwyer's departure, and Captain Dwyer subsequently learned that General Sibley had left Richmond at the period designated. I am in receipt of no other information on these subjects, but regard Captain Dwyer's information as perfectly certain, he having himself seen the orders of the Department to General Sibley.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. M. JACKSON,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. DIST. OF TEXAS, NEW MEXICO, AND ARIZONA,

Houston, Tex., December 27, 1862.

His Excellency Governor LUBBOCK:

GOVERNOR: I am instructed by Major-General Magruder to state that the militia which has already been called out are required at the earliest moment possible to strengthen the army and to provide for the defenses of the State. You are therefore respectfully requested to give immediate orders for the commanding officers to report with their companies, organized in accordance with the Confederate States regulations, at this place. You are also requested to provide them with a full supply of arms and ammunition, as they will be immediately sent to the coast to provide for its defense.

I am, Governor, very respectfully,

A. G. DICKINSON,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

PORT HUDSON, December 28, 1862.

Lieutenant-General PEMBERTON:

General Gardner has arrived and assumed command.

WM. N. R. BEALL,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS, PORT HUDSON,

December 29, 1862.

ASST. ADJT. GENERAL, DEPT. OF MISS. AND LA.,

Jackson, Miss.:

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report concerning this post:

I have kept myself busy in reconnoitering the locality, and I find that a large amount of work has been done, and generally well done, but there is yet a great deal to do. The batteries are generally well posted and well made, but there is not a sufficient supply of ammunition. The field works are well laid out and well constructed and are being pushed as rapidly as the limited means will permit. I would respectfully urge that a large number of axes, spades, and pick-axes may be sent as soon as possible. The very broken country, even within the lines, makes it difficult to fortify every part as thoroughly

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