War of the Rebellion: Serial 021 Page 0894 W. FLA., S. ALA., S. MISS., LA., TEX., N. MEX. Chapter XXVII.

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[Inclosure C.]

EXECUTIVE OFFICE,

Alexandria, La., October 2, 1862.

Brigadier General DANIEL RUGGLES,

Commanding District of the Mississippi, Jackson:

GENERAL: I have noticed published in the Mississippi newspapers, by your command, a general order, No. 2, dated September 8, 1862, appointing provost-marshals and specifying their duties.

As your order affects a portion of this State I beg to ask you if, in your opinion, articles 56 and 57 of the Articles of War apply to citizens?

I feel assured they do not, but should you differ from me in this opinion I have the request that you will suspend their operation as far as regards citizens until I am hear from the President, whom I addressed to-day on the subject.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

THO. O. MOORE,

Governor of Louisiana.

HDQRS. DIST. OF TEXAS, NEW MEXICO, AND ARIZONA,

Houston, Tex., December 8, 1862.

Major S. S. ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Trans-Mississippi Department:

SIR: Having been informed that Brigadier-General Sibley's brigade had been ordered back to the district, and being in great need of light artillery, I have ordered to Valverde Battery, Captain Sayers, to remain in camp at Marshall, Tex., until orders shall be received from the lieutenant-general commanding in regard to it. I have to request that, if possible, this battery may be left in this district subject to my orders, and such do I consider the importance of the request that I send a special messenger to bring the orders of the lieutenant-general commanding in relation to it.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DIST. OF TEXAS, NEW MEXICO, AND ARIZONA,

Houston, Tex., December 9, 1862.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: I have the honor respectfully to represent that I find the various commands in this district almost without arms. Brigadier-General Sibley's command is very deficient in that particular, the men having sold their arms when they retreated from New Mexico to citizens and Mexicans to procure food and clothing, of which they were at once time almost destitute. These arms were afterward bought up and given to other troops, which have left the State. Only 1,200 men of this brigade are armed, and they indifferently. Of Baylor's command (some twenty-two companies in process of organization) about 500 men have assembled, and only 35 are armed at all. I have only 1,000 Enfield