War of the Rebellion: Serial 021 Page 0787 Chapter XXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

from this point. Our men are scattered so much on picket duty I can not rally much force before the enemy may be on me. I shall did all I can and keep you informed of their movements. Please answer.

J. DE BAUN,

Major.

PONCHATOULA, LA., July 27, 1862.

General RUGGLES:

The following dispatch just received from Captain Slocum:

Federals 200 or 300 strong on steamer Crey Cloud, 1 1\2 miles below Covington. The New London is lying out below Mandeville.

I have only 25 effective men.

W. D. L. McRAE.

PONCHATOULA, LA., July 27, 1862.

General RUGGLES:

Have received another dispatch from Captain Slocum. Four hundred Yankess landed in Covington; put out pickets. New London and Grey Cloud lying off 1 1\2 miles. Captain Bredow was here from Van Buren; says the detachment order there has no corn provisions; will leave there to-morrow.

W. D. L. McRAE.

TANGIPAHOA, July 27, [1862].

Captain [W. D. L.] MCREA, Ponchatoula:

Will give orders soon about forces to meet Federals at Covington.

General Breckinridge will soon be here and I await his arrival to make further moves. Keep me advised of the movements of the enemy. Keep a strong picket of Rangers at Van Buren and on railroad below. Concentrate rest toward Covington to watch enemy.

DANIEL RUGGLES,

Brigadier-General.

CLINTON, LA., July 27, 1862. (Received July 28.)

Captain JAMES O. FUGUA, Camp Moore, La.:

SIR: I looked for your over last night, as I was informed by one of your cousins that it was your intention to come home. Our community has been under some excitement for two or three days in reference to a skirmish between a scouting party of the enemy from Baton Rouge and our Rangers on the Amite River at or near Henry Warnach's. I saw a gentleman from within a short distance of Baton Ronge yesterday, from whom I learn some of the particulars. The Federals, as this gentleman (A. M. Stewart, an uncle of Duncan Stewart) informs me, were 50 strong-cavalry of course. Our forces were much larger, but in what numbers the enemy were [were] not able to tell, not have we yet learned. The enemy report a loss of 2 men killed and some others wounded. They also captured 12 or 15 horses, with saddles, bridles, &c.; besides, they brought in 4 prisoners, Henry Warnach being one of the number.