War of the Rebellion: Serial 021 Page 0727 Chapter XXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

however, desirable to have the Sykes return here as speedily as possible.

Very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

RICH'D B. IRWIN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE GULF, NINETEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Alexandria, May 11, 1863-10.30 a. m.

Brigadier General G. WEITZEL, Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: By direction of the commanding general I have the honor to inform you that it is now contemplated to move as soon as practicable to Simmesport with the whole of the command. It is expected that General Grant will send a force to Bayou Sara to co-operate with us, and we have a report that four transports loaded with troops from Charleston, with a number of iron-clads, have arrived, and are on the way from New Orleans to Baton Rouge. It is expected that your command will act as rear guard in our movement.

In regard to the orders sent you this morning, the commanding-general desires that you will, before returning, disperse any force the enemy may have at or near Cotile, and to get all the information obtainable respecting the position of the enemy at Grand Ecore, about 4 miles from Natchitoches, or elsewhere in that direction.

Very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

RICH'D B. IRWIN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Duplicate sent 3 p. m. with the following postscript:

P. S.- Your dispatch of 12 m. to-day has been received and highly approved by the commanding-general, who desires you to continue your movement as far as you deem it prudent to do so. We have no gunboat there that could go up the river.

RICH'D B. IRWIN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE GULF, NINETEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Alexandria, May 12, 1863-8 a. m.

Col. S. B. HOLABIRD,

Chief Quartermaster, New Orleans:

COLONEL: Dispatches received at 7 this morning inform me that he [General Grant] is moving against Vicksburg and requires me to join him. It is out of human power to do this, and I am left to move against Port Hudson alone.

The stores at Barre's Landing and the animals and negroes at Berwick Bay should be crossed at once and the transportation collected to cross my command. The disabled men must be put on transports at Barre's Landing and at New Iberia, on the Teche, on our march. Bring everything from New Orleans that can float on these waters. There has been criminal delay in doing this, which I have repeatedly ordered in the last four weeks, even since our advance from Franklin. Let it be done now. If it has not been done, schooners, flats, and steamers will serve us. My