War of the Rebellion: Serial 021 Page 0651 Chapter XXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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up from men selected from that regiment, and furnished with three 6-pounder guns, captured from the enemy previous to the battle of Baton Rouge.

All of the above batteries, with the exception of the Eighteenth New York, Captain Mack, were mounted previous to my arrival in the city, and I am informed, though not fully equipped, are in a condition to perform field service. Many of the requisitions sent to the ordnance department have not been filled, owing to the non-arrival of the stores now overdue. A circular has been issued from this office to the commanders of batteries, calling for an inventory of the ordnance and ordnance stores on hand, and directing requisitions to be made out for all the articles necessary to place them in a perfect state of efficiency. These will be filled as rapidly as the Chief of Ordnance can meet the demand.

LIST OF FOOT COMPANIES OF ARTILLERY.

Commander's name, company, and Nature of ordnance and caliber

station. of each.

Captain Harvey A. Allen, Company Garrison duty.

K, 2nd U. S. Artillery, Fort

Pickens.

Captain Frank Larned, Company H, Do.

2nd U. S. Artillery, Fort

Barrancas.

Captain George G. Trull, 4th Do.

Massachusetts Battery, Fort

Pike.

Captain George W. Duncan, 1st Two 6-pounder rifled guns, two

Vermont Battery, Camp Parapet. 6-pounder guns, two 6-pounder

howitzers.

From which it will be seen there are ten complete mounted batteries, one company of infantry acting as such, with three guns, and a section of the Fourth Massachusetts mounted.

So long as Pensacola is held by our forces I could not recommend the moving of the artillery companies at Forts Pickens and Barrancas. I would, however, suggest, as soon as their services can be dispensed with, the ordering of Captain Duncan at Camp Parapet and Captain Trull's company at Fort Pike to this city to be mounted.

The Twenty-first, Twenty-fifth, and Twenty-sixth New York Batteries are now on the way to this city on vessels containing artillery horses. On their arrival, should it be your desire, they can be at once organized and equipped, which will give a total of fifteen batteries and ninety pieces of artillery of various calibers in preparation for assignment to the divisions of the corps.

In conclusion, I would suggest as a basis of organization of the artillery for field operations the assignment of three batteries to each division, under the direct orders of the division commanders, to be composed as follows: One battery of six 12-pounder Napoleon guns, one of six rifles, and a mixed battery of four smooth-bore and two rifles. This, in my opinion, will give the best proportion and most efficient combination for both combined and separate operations, due reference being had to the artillery of reserve. Should this arrangement meet with your approval I will furnish a list of the batteries arranged for each division.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHARD ARNOLD,

Captain, Fifth Artillery, Chief of Artillery.