War of the Rebellion: Serial 021 Page 0587 Chapter XXVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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QUARANTINE STATION, MISSISSIPPI RIVER, October 20, 1862.

Dr. CHARLES McCORMICK, U. S. A.,

Medical Director Department of the Gulf, New Orleans:

SIR: Inclosed please receive bill of health issued by the American consul at Matamoras, Mex., to the schooner Planet.

In conversation with some of the Texas refugees, passengers on board schooner Planet, I learn that the yellow fever was declared as an epidemic at Brownsville, Tex., yet this consul certifies to health in the port, among the shipping, and in the vicinity of Matamoras.

My informant declares this to be so, having read the publication in the Brownsville paper a few days prior to their departure.

The order from Major-General Butler in relation to sending the schooner and men back to the fort was complied with. I on Saturday went down and examined their condition; found some sick with remittent fever, gastric and bilious complication, and deemed it advisable to bring to schooner, crew, and passengers up again to the station and await the result of a few days. I have two bad cases now in hospital, and from appearances among the others shall have more.

Some 10 or 12 of these refugees are willing to enlist, but the remainder refuse, on the ground of having left their families behind in Texas, and are desirous of entering a column which is to be composed of and commanded by Texans. They say that their pledge is given to join General Hamilton's corps.

Respectfully, yours, &c.,

JNO. A. G. FISHER,

Resident Physician Quarantine Station.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, New Orleans, October 30, 1862.

Brigadier-General WEITZEL,

Commanding Reserve Corps, Thidobeaux, La.:

GENERAL: I have received your reports of the 28th and 29th instant, the last inclosing a list of killed and wounded.* I cannot speak too highly of the admirable conduct of your troops and your own brilliant success in the expedition. I have pushed forward the opening of the road as vigorously as possible. Colonel Stafford left Wednesday afternoon with timber sufficient, as he said, to repair the bridge at Bayou des Allemands, and he assured me that he would be able to do it in two days or three at outside. I have directed Colonel Thomas, by the same messenger, to push forward the bulk of his regiment as fast as he can repair the track and to join you at Thibodeaux.

Your requisition shall be filled and forwarded at the earliest practicable moment.

Buchanan was to have made his attack on Tuesday at Berwick, with what success of course I cannot say as yet. We were delayed three days by a most terrible storm, which disabled by Diana, but I have got her in working order, and she has gone around.

I have ordered over the Second Native Guards (colored), who will hold the road while Stafford pushes on to Thibodeaux.

I sympathize with you in the matter of the negroes. By the act of

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*See reports, p. 167.

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