War of the Rebellion: Serial 021 Page 0510 W. FLA., S. ALA., S. MISS., LA., TEX., N. MEX. Chapter XXVII.

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OUR STRUGGLE AND ITS SURE RESULT.

The loss of New Orleans, bitter humiliation as it was to Louisiana, has not created despondency nor shaken our abiding faith in our success. Not to the eye of the enthusiastic patriot alone, who might be expected to color events with his hopes, but to the more impassioned gaze of the statesman that success was certain from the beginning. It is only the timid, the unreflecting, and the property owner who thinks more of his possessions than his country that will succumb to the depressing influences of disaster. The great heart of the people has swelled with more intense aspirations for the cause the more it seemed to totter. Their confidence is well founded. The possession by the enemy of our seaboard and main water-courses ought to have been foreseen by us. His overwhelming naval force necessarily accomplished the same results attained by the British with the same force in their war of subjugation. The final result will be the same. Let us turn unheeding erst the rumors of foreign intervention. To believe is to rely on them. We must rely only on ourselves. Our recognition as a nation is one of those certainties of the future which nothing but our own unfaithfulness can prevent. We must not look around for help when the enemy is straight before us. Help yourself. It is the great instrument of national as of individual success.

THO. O. MOORE,

Governor of Louisiana.

OPELOUSAS, June 18, 1862.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

AN IMPORTANT ORDER.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPT. OF LA., MISS., AND E. LA., No. 1.

Jackson, Miss., June 24, 1862.

By order of the President the undersigned assumes command of this department. It is recommended to all persons living within 8 miles of the Mississippi River to remove their families and servants to the interior, as it is the intention to defend the department to the last extremity.

EARL VAN DORN,

Major-General.

[Inclosure No. 3.]

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, No. 150.

New Orleans, June 30, 1862.

Mrs. Philips, wife of Philip Philips, having been once imprisoned for here traitorous proclivities and acts at Washington and released by the clemency of the Government, and having been found training her children to spit upon officers of the United States, for which act of one of those children both her husband and herself apologized and were again forgiven, is now found on the balcony of her house during the passage of the funeral procession of Lieutenant De Kay laughing and mocking at his remains, and upon being inquired of by the commanding general if this fact were so contemptuously replied, "I was in good spirits that day:"

It is therefore ordered that she be not "regarded and treated as a common woman," of whom no officer or soldier is bound to take notice,